COVID-19 (coronavirus disease) is a global pandemic that started in China in 2019 and has negatively affected all economic sectors of the world, including agriculture. However, according to estimates in different countries, agriculture has suffered less than other sectors such as construction, industry and tourism, so agricultural development can be a good option to compensate for the economic damage caused to other sectors. The quality of available water and soil resources for agricultural development is not only limited, but is also decreasing incrementally, so the use of saline and unconventional soil and water resources is inevitable. Biosaline agriculture or haloculture is a system in which highly saline water and soil resources are used sustainably for the economic production of agricultural crops. It seems that in the current situation of the world (with COVID-19's impact on agriculture on the one hand and the quantitative and qualitative decline of freshwater and soil on the other), haloculture with a re-reading of territorial capabilities has good potential to provide a part of human food supply. In this review article, the potential of haloculture to offset the adverse impacts of the pandemic is analyzed from five perspectives: increasing the area under cultivation, using unconventional water, stabilizing dust centers, increasing the body's immune resistance, and reducing losses in agribusiness due to the coronavirus. Overall, haloculture is an essential system, which COVID-19 has accelerated in the agricultural sector.

Haloculture: A system to mitigate the negative impacts of pandemics on the environment, society and economy, emphasizing COVID-19

Race M.;
2021

Abstract

COVID-19 (coronavirus disease) is a global pandemic that started in China in 2019 and has negatively affected all economic sectors of the world, including agriculture. However, according to estimates in different countries, agriculture has suffered less than other sectors such as construction, industry and tourism, so agricultural development can be a good option to compensate for the economic damage caused to other sectors. The quality of available water and soil resources for agricultural development is not only limited, but is also decreasing incrementally, so the use of saline and unconventional soil and water resources is inevitable. Biosaline agriculture or haloculture is a system in which highly saline water and soil resources are used sustainably for the economic production of agricultural crops. It seems that in the current situation of the world (with COVID-19's impact on agriculture on the one hand and the quantitative and qualitative decline of freshwater and soil on the other), haloculture with a re-reading of territorial capabilities has good potential to provide a part of human food supply. In this review article, the potential of haloculture to offset the adverse impacts of the pandemic is analyzed from five perspectives: increasing the area under cultivation, using unconventional water, stabilizing dust centers, increasing the body's immune resistance, and reducing losses in agribusiness due to the coronavirus. Overall, haloculture is an essential system, which COVID-19 has accelerated in the agricultural sector.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/89365
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