Anthropometrics and sex influence balance performances, and visual information can change anthropometrics’ relation and the postural sway. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of anthropometric characteristics, sex, and visual biofeedback and/or their interaction on a computerized wobble board. Twenty-seven (14 females, 13 males) young adults performed three 30-s double leg stance trials on a wobble board during two conditions: with visual and without visual biofeedback. Visual biofeedback improved (p = 0.010) balance on a wobble board with respect to the condition without visual biofeedback. Regardless of sex, no differences between conditions were found (p = 0.088). When investigating the effect of anthropometrics variables, sex, and their interactions on conditions, a significant main effect of the lower limb/height ratio, sex, and their interaction on the condition without visual biofeedback was found (p = 0.0008; R2 = 0.57). For the visual biofeedback condition, significant effects for sex and body mass (p = 0.0012; R2 = 0.43) and sex and whole-body moment of inertia (p = 0.0030; R2 = 0.39) were found. Results from the present study showed (1) visual biofeedback improved wobble board balance performance; (2) a significant main effect of lower limb/height ratio, sex, and their interaction on the wobble board performances without visual biofeedback emerged; (3) significant effects were found for sex and body mass and sex and moment of inertia in the visual biofeedback condition. Findings from the present study could have an impact on training and evaluations protocols, especially when several populations such as children, athletes, older adults and people with balance disorders are involved.

Association between anthropometric variables, sex, and visual biofeedback in dynamic postural control assessed on a computerized wobble board

De Maio M.;Cortis C.
;
Iannaccone A.;Fusco A.
2021

Abstract

Anthropometrics and sex influence balance performances, and visual information can change anthropometrics’ relation and the postural sway. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of anthropometric characteristics, sex, and visual biofeedback and/or their interaction on a computerized wobble board. Twenty-seven (14 females, 13 males) young adults performed three 30-s double leg stance trials on a wobble board during two conditions: with visual and without visual biofeedback. Visual biofeedback improved (p = 0.010) balance on a wobble board with respect to the condition without visual biofeedback. Regardless of sex, no differences between conditions were found (p = 0.088). When investigating the effect of anthropometrics variables, sex, and their interactions on conditions, a significant main effect of the lower limb/height ratio, sex, and their interaction on the condition without visual biofeedback was found (p = 0.0008; R2 = 0.57). For the visual biofeedback condition, significant effects for sex and body mass (p = 0.0012; R2 = 0.43) and sex and whole-body moment of inertia (p = 0.0030; R2 = 0.39) were found. Results from the present study showed (1) visual biofeedback improved wobble board balance performance; (2) a significant main effect of lower limb/height ratio, sex, and their interaction on the wobble board performances without visual biofeedback emerged; (3) significant effects were found for sex and body mass and sex and moment of inertia in the visual biofeedback condition. Findings from the present study could have an impact on training and evaluations protocols, especially when several populations such as children, athletes, older adults and people with balance disorders are involved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/85489
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