A new method to combine interface damage and friction in a cohesive-zone model is proposed. Starting from the mesomechanical assumption, typically made in a damage-mechanics approach, whereby a representative elementary area of the interface can be additively decomposed into an undamaged and a fully damaged part, the main idea consists of assuming that friction occurs only on the fully damaged part. The gradual increase of the friction effect is then a natural outcome of the gradual increase of the interface damage from the initial undamaged state to the complete decohesion. Suitable kinematic and static hypotheses are made in order to develop the interface model whereas no special assumptions are required on the damage evolution equations and on the friction law. Here, the Crisfield’s interface model is used for the damage evolution and a simple Coulomb friction relationship is adopted. Numerical and analytical results for two types of constitutive problem show the effectiveness of the model to capture all the main features of the combined effect of interface damage and friction. A finite-step interface law has then been derived and implemented in a finite-element code via interface elements. The results of the simulations made for a fibre push-out test and a masonry wall loaded in compression and shear are then presented and compared with available experimental results. They show the effectiveness of the proposed model to predict the failure mechanisms and the overall structural response for the analysed problems.

Combining interface damage and friction in a cohesive-zone model

SACCO, Elio
2006

Abstract

A new method to combine interface damage and friction in a cohesive-zone model is proposed. Starting from the mesomechanical assumption, typically made in a damage-mechanics approach, whereby a representative elementary area of the interface can be additively decomposed into an undamaged and a fully damaged part, the main idea consists of assuming that friction occurs only on the fully damaged part. The gradual increase of the friction effect is then a natural outcome of the gradual increase of the interface damage from the initial undamaged state to the complete decohesion. Suitable kinematic and static hypotheses are made in order to develop the interface model whereas no special assumptions are required on the damage evolution equations and on the friction law. Here, the Crisfield’s interface model is used for the damage evolution and a simple Coulomb friction relationship is adopted. Numerical and analytical results for two types of constitutive problem show the effectiveness of the model to capture all the main features of the combined effect of interface damage and friction. A finite-step interface law has then been derived and implemented in a finite-element code via interface elements. The results of the simulations made for a fibre push-out test and a masonry wall loaded in compression and shear are then presented and compared with available experimental results. They show the effectiveness of the proposed model to predict the failure mechanisms and the overall structural response for the analysed problems.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/8471
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