In this paper the techno-economic analysis of two plant configurations for the polygeneration of heat, hydrogen and electricity (combined heat, hydrogen and power, CHHP) in novel refueling stations, is performed. The CHHP plants, fed by ammonia as primary fuel, are designed for satisfying the energy demands of a sustainable and environmental friendly mobility based on hydrogen and electric vehicles. Both configurations consist of: a) the power production section (PPS) based on SOFC technology; b) the hydrogen separation section (HSS) based on a Pd-membrane unit; c) the hydrogen compression and storage section (HCSS) that uses the ionic compression technology. The proposed configurations differ for the power production section and, as a consequence, for the size and the operating conditions of the SOFC power module. In the first case, the SOFC power module is sized both for self-sustaining the plant electric power consumption and for producing 100 kg/day of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, while in the second one the SOFC power module is sized for satisfying the plant electric power consumption, the electric power needed for the DC fast charging of electric vehicles and for producing 100 kg/day of hydrogen. The energy performances of the CHHP plants have been calculated by using the numerical modeling and the economic analysis has been carried out by evaluating some economic indicators such as the Profitability Index (PI) and the Discounted Payback Period (DPBP) in the current, medium-term and long-term scenarios. Results have highlighted that the first proposed configuration allows to reach a higher polygeneration efficiency (86.4%), a higher PI (2.4 in the long-term scenario) and a lower DPBP (8 years in the long-term scenario).

TECHNO-ECONOMIC ASSESSMENT OF AN AMMONIA-FUELED SOFC IN POLYGENERATION SYSTEMS

A. Perna;
2019

Abstract

In this paper the techno-economic analysis of two plant configurations for the polygeneration of heat, hydrogen and electricity (combined heat, hydrogen and power, CHHP) in novel refueling stations, is performed. The CHHP plants, fed by ammonia as primary fuel, are designed for satisfying the energy demands of a sustainable and environmental friendly mobility based on hydrogen and electric vehicles. Both configurations consist of: a) the power production section (PPS) based on SOFC technology; b) the hydrogen separation section (HSS) based on a Pd-membrane unit; c) the hydrogen compression and storage section (HCSS) that uses the ionic compression technology. The proposed configurations differ for the power production section and, as a consequence, for the size and the operating conditions of the SOFC power module. In the first case, the SOFC power module is sized both for self-sustaining the plant electric power consumption and for producing 100 kg/day of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles, while in the second one the SOFC power module is sized for satisfying the plant electric power consumption, the electric power needed for the DC fast charging of electric vehicles and for producing 100 kg/day of hydrogen. The energy performances of the CHHP plants have been calculated by using the numerical modeling and the economic analysis has been carried out by evaluating some economic indicators such as the Profitability Index (PI) and the Discounted Payback Period (DPBP) in the current, medium-term and long-term scenarios. Results have highlighted that the first proposed configuration allows to reach a higher polygeneration efficiency (86.4%), a higher PI (2.4 in the long-term scenario) and a lower DPBP (8 years in the long-term scenario).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/74152
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