In order to reduce children's exposure to pollutants in classrooms a proper ventilation strategy need to be adopted. Such strategy is even more important in naturally ventilated schools where the air exchange rate is only based on the manual airing of classrooms. The present work aimed to evaluate the effect of the manual airing strategy on indoor air quality in Italian classrooms. For this aim, schools located in the Central Italy were investigated. Indoor air quality was studied in terms of CO2, particle number and PM concentrations and compared to corresponding outdoor levels. In particular two experimental analyses were performed: i) a comparison between heating and non heating season in different schools; ii) an evaluation of the effect of scheduled airing periods on the dilution of indoor-generated pollutants and the penetration of outdoor-generated ones. In particular, different airing procedures, i.e. different window opening periods (5 to 20min per hour) were imposed and controlled through contacts installed on classroom windows and doors. Results revealed that the airing strategy differently affect the several pollutants detected in indoors depending on their size, origin and dynamics. Longer airing periods may result in reduced indoor CO2 concentrations and, similarly, other gaseous indoor-generated pollutants. Simultaneously, higher ultrafine particle (and other vehicular-related pollutants) levels in indoors were measured due to infiltration from outdoors. Finally, a negligible effect of the manual airing on PM levels in classroom was detected. Therefore, a simultaneous reduction in concentration levels for all the pollutant metrics in classrooms cannot be obtained just relying upon air permeability of the building envelope and manual airing of the classrooms.

The effect of natural ventilation strategy on indoor air quality in schools

STABILE, Luca;DELL'ISOLA, Marco;RUSSI, Aldo Giovanni Giuliano;MASSIMO, Angelamaria;BUONANNO, Giorgio
2017-01-01

Abstract

In order to reduce children's exposure to pollutants in classrooms a proper ventilation strategy need to be adopted. Such strategy is even more important in naturally ventilated schools where the air exchange rate is only based on the manual airing of classrooms. The present work aimed to evaluate the effect of the manual airing strategy on indoor air quality in Italian classrooms. For this aim, schools located in the Central Italy were investigated. Indoor air quality was studied in terms of CO2, particle number and PM concentrations and compared to corresponding outdoor levels. In particular two experimental analyses were performed: i) a comparison between heating and non heating season in different schools; ii) an evaluation of the effect of scheduled airing periods on the dilution of indoor-generated pollutants and the penetration of outdoor-generated ones. In particular, different airing procedures, i.e. different window opening periods (5 to 20min per hour) were imposed and controlled through contacts installed on classroom windows and doors. Results revealed that the airing strategy differently affect the several pollutants detected in indoors depending on their size, origin and dynamics. Longer airing periods may result in reduced indoor CO2 concentrations and, similarly, other gaseous indoor-generated pollutants. Simultaneously, higher ultrafine particle (and other vehicular-related pollutants) levels in indoors were measured due to infiltration from outdoors. Finally, a negligible effect of the manual airing on PM levels in classroom was detected. Therefore, a simultaneous reduction in concentration levels for all the pollutant metrics in classrooms cannot be obtained just relying upon air permeability of the building envelope and manual airing of the classrooms.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11580/63043
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