Underground metro networks can provide an effective solution to transport demand problems within a sustainable development framework although they can be characterised by high environmental impact. Railway induced ground-borne vibrations affect both surface and underground lines and are often claimed to be liable for cosmetic damages and for nuisance in buildings nearby. The approach to the problem usually implies the in-depth study of the three main phases in which the phenomenon can be split: the generation due to the dynamic interaction between the rolling stock and the railway superstructure, the propagation through the tunnel lining and the surrounding soils, the assessment of the impact on the ‘sensitive subjects’. In this paper, preliminary results following an extensive research that has been carried out on this subject within the VINCES project are presented. An experimental campaign has been performed on two test sites where Light and Heavy Rail Transit systems are operating. The experimental measurements have been carefully processed in order to extract representative vibration amplitudes and to calibrate a prediction model of vibration generation. This latter takes into account the PSD of rail defects, the mechanical and inertial properties of the vehicle as well as of the railway track. The propagation was simulated by 2D numerical modelling, accounting for soil properties derived from accurate geotechnical and geophysical investigations. In both cases, a reasonably good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental data has been observed.

Experimental measurements and numerical simulations of underground railway ground-borne vibrations

D'APUZZO, Mauro;
2007

Abstract

Underground metro networks can provide an effective solution to transport demand problems within a sustainable development framework although they can be characterised by high environmental impact. Railway induced ground-borne vibrations affect both surface and underground lines and are often claimed to be liable for cosmetic damages and for nuisance in buildings nearby. The approach to the problem usually implies the in-depth study of the three main phases in which the phenomenon can be split: the generation due to the dynamic interaction between the rolling stock and the railway superstructure, the propagation through the tunnel lining and the surrounding soils, the assessment of the impact on the ‘sensitive subjects’. In this paper, preliminary results following an extensive research that has been carried out on this subject within the VINCES project are presented. An experimental campaign has been performed on two test sites where Light and Heavy Rail Transit systems are operating. The experimental measurements have been carefully processed in order to extract representative vibration amplitudes and to calibrate a prediction model of vibration generation. This latter takes into account the PSD of rail defects, the mechanical and inertial properties of the vehicle as well as of the railway track. The propagation was simulated by 2D numerical modelling, accounting for soil properties derived from accurate geotechnical and geophysical investigations. In both cases, a reasonably good agreement between numerical simulations and experimental data has been observed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/5582
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