Effects of different pacesetters on the energy expenditure during arm crank ergometer exercise. Lecce D.1, Cortis C.1,Sanuheza Alfaro S.P.1, Fattorini L.2, Rodio A.1 1 Department of Human Sciences, Society and Health - University of Cassino and Southern Lazio -Italy 2 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology - Sapienza University of Rome - Italy Introduction Although training synchronized with music has been recognized to have a positive effect on physical activity(1), there is a lack of knowledge concerning the use of others pacesetters on performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the effects of visual and acoustic pacesetters on oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate(HR) during exercise performed on an arm crank ergometer. Methods Six physically active male subjects (age: 27.0±5.5yrs; height: 177.5±2.5cm; weight: 75.5±6.8kg) participated in this pilot study. Participants were underwent to a 20 minutes exercise at an individualized load corresponding to the 80% of the ventilatory threshold, performed on arm cranking ergometer (Monark 881E, Stockholm, Sweden).Three randomized experimental sessions were performed by each subject: training with music (TM), training with a video representing an exercise performed by another subject with no audio (VS) and training with a video including a series of rhythmic images with no audio (VRI). HR and VO2were continuously (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy) measured during the three sessions. Level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results VO2(1.8±0.4l.min-1) and HR(135.1±9.5b.min-1)were lower (p<0.05)in the VRI with respect to TM(VO2: 2.4±0.1l.min-1; HR: 163.6±19.5b.min-1), while no differences emerged with respect to VS(VO2: 2.03±0.23l.min-1; HR:142.6±11.7b.min-1). Discussion Findings from this preliminary study showed lower energy expenditure when exercising watching an image sequence than observing an athlete performing the same technical movements. The lower metabolic and cardiac response observed could be explained by the theory of mirror neurons(2). In fact, watching another person performing a motor task could activate neurons coding the same specific motor task while reducing the neuronal activity linked to intermediate cognitive mediation. Comparing the two visual sessions, differences in VO2 and HR could be due to the fact that in the VRI the rhythm is better time locked while in the VS the recurring motion of athlete’s gesture makes the rhythm less obvious. Moreover, a tempting hypothes is could be that visual pacesetters maybe increase the arousal state and reduce noises (i.e. other than the motor task). Results from this investigation could be used for the development of new training strategies, in which images projected at various frequencies can be showed to the athletes to indicate the correct rhythm of the technical movement. References 1. Karageorghis et al. Res Q Exerc Sport2006 2. Rizzolatti et al. Nat ClinPractNeurol2009

Effects of different pacesetters on the energy expenditure during arm crank ergometer exercise.

CORTIS, Cristina;RODIO, Angelo
2013

Abstract

Effects of different pacesetters on the energy expenditure during arm crank ergometer exercise. Lecce D.1, Cortis C.1,Sanuheza Alfaro S.P.1, Fattorini L.2, Rodio A.1 1 Department of Human Sciences, Society and Health - University of Cassino and Southern Lazio -Italy 2 Department of Physiology and Pharmacology - Sapienza University of Rome - Italy Introduction Although training synchronized with music has been recognized to have a positive effect on physical activity(1), there is a lack of knowledge concerning the use of others pacesetters on performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the effects of visual and acoustic pacesetters on oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate(HR) during exercise performed on an arm crank ergometer. Methods Six physically active male subjects (age: 27.0±5.5yrs; height: 177.5±2.5cm; weight: 75.5±6.8kg) participated in this pilot study. Participants were underwent to a 20 minutes exercise at an individualized load corresponding to the 80% of the ventilatory threshold, performed on arm cranking ergometer (Monark 881E, Stockholm, Sweden).Three randomized experimental sessions were performed by each subject: training with music (TM), training with a video representing an exercise performed by another subject with no audio (VS) and training with a video including a series of rhythmic images with no audio (VRI). HR and VO2were continuously (K4 b2, Cosmed, Rome, Italy) measured during the three sessions. Level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results VO2(1.8±0.4l.min-1) and HR(135.1±9.5b.min-1)were lower (p<0.05)in the VRI with respect to TM(VO2: 2.4±0.1l.min-1; HR: 163.6±19.5b.min-1), while no differences emerged with respect to VS(VO2: 2.03±0.23l.min-1; HR:142.6±11.7b.min-1). Discussion Findings from this preliminary study showed lower energy expenditure when exercising watching an image sequence than observing an athlete performing the same technical movements. The lower metabolic and cardiac response observed could be explained by the theory of mirror neurons(2). In fact, watching another person performing a motor task could activate neurons coding the same specific motor task while reducing the neuronal activity linked to intermediate cognitive mediation. Comparing the two visual sessions, differences in VO2 and HR could be due to the fact that in the VRI the rhythm is better time locked while in the VS the recurring motion of athlete’s gesture makes the rhythm less obvious. Moreover, a tempting hypothes is could be that visual pacesetters maybe increase the arousal state and reduce noises (i.e. other than the motor task). Results from this investigation could be used for the development of new training strategies, in which images projected at various frequencies can be showed to the athletes to indicate the correct rhythm of the technical movement. References 1. Karageorghis et al. Res Q Exerc Sport2006 2. Rizzolatti et al. Nat ClinPractNeurol2009
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/32862
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