This study aimed to 1) analyze the energy requirement (V•O 2eq) and the contribution of the aerobic (V•O2ex), anaerobic alactic (V•O2al), and anaerobic lactic (V•O 2la-) energy sources of a simulated intervention; 2) ascertain differences in mean VO2 and heart rate (HR) during firefighting tasks; and 3) verify the relationship between time of job completion and the fitness level of firefighters. Twenty Italian firefighters (age = 32 ± 6 yr, V•O2peak = 43.1 ± 4.9 mL·kg -1·min-1) performed 4 consecutive tasks (i.e., child rescue; 250-m run; find an exit; 250-m run) that required a V•O 2eq of 406.26±73.91 mL· kg-1 (V•O 2ex = 86 ± 5%; V•O2al = 9 ± 3%; VO 2la- = 5 ± 3%). After 30 minutes, the recovery HR (108 ± 15 beats·min-1) and VO2 (8.86±2.67mL·kg-1·min-1) were higher (p > 0.0001) than basal values (HR = 66 ± 8 beats·min -1; VO2 = 4.57 ± 1.07 mL·kg -1·min-1), indicating that passive recovery is insufficient in reducing the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain of the previous workload. Differences (p > 0.001) between tasks emerged for mean V•O2 and HR, with a lack of significant correlation between the time of job completion and the firefighters' aerobic fitness. These findings indicate that unpredictable working conditions highly challenge expert firefighters who need adequate fitness levels to meet the requirements of their work. Practically, to enhance the fitness level of firefighters, specific interval training programs should include a wide variety of tasks requiring different intensities and decision-making strategies.

Energy Cost and Energy Sources during a Simulated Firefighting Activity

CORTIS, Cristina;
2010

Abstract

This study aimed to 1) analyze the energy requirement (V•O 2eq) and the contribution of the aerobic (V•O2ex), anaerobic alactic (V•O2al), and anaerobic lactic (V•O 2la-) energy sources of a simulated intervention; 2) ascertain differences in mean VO2 and heart rate (HR) during firefighting tasks; and 3) verify the relationship between time of job completion and the fitness level of firefighters. Twenty Italian firefighters (age = 32 ± 6 yr, V•O2peak = 43.1 ± 4.9 mL·kg -1·min-1) performed 4 consecutive tasks (i.e., child rescue; 250-m run; find an exit; 250-m run) that required a V•O 2eq of 406.26±73.91 mL· kg-1 (V•O 2ex = 86 ± 5%; V•O2al = 9 ± 3%; VO 2la- = 5 ± 3%). After 30 minutes, the recovery HR (108 ± 15 beats·min-1) and VO2 (8.86±2.67mL·kg-1·min-1) were higher (p > 0.0001) than basal values (HR = 66 ± 8 beats·min -1; VO2 = 4.57 ± 1.07 mL·kg -1·min-1), indicating that passive recovery is insufficient in reducing the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory strain of the previous workload. Differences (p > 0.001) between tasks emerged for mean V•O2 and HR, with a lack of significant correlation between the time of job completion and the firefighters' aerobic fitness. These findings indicate that unpredictable working conditions highly challenge expert firefighters who need adequate fitness levels to meet the requirements of their work. Practically, to enhance the fitness level of firefighters, specific interval training programs should include a wide variety of tasks requiring different intensities and decision-making strategies.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/16597
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 11
  • Scopus 46
social impact