In north-western Libya the Jebel Gharbi, concession area for the Italian-Libyan Archaeological Mission organized by the Universities of Rome Sapienza and Cassino, thanks to the notable continuity in its archaeological record, has offered plentiful data even for the most difficult environmental phases in the Last Glacial Maximum, when the largest part of northern Africa was abandoned. Geological studies carried out in the frame of the Joint Mission allowed for some Late Pleistocene and Holocene humid (or not so arid) phases could be identified. The oldest humid phase was dated around 42,000-48,000 radiocarbon years BP, and it follows a dry period during which aeolian sand, dated 49,200 ± 3500 with OSL method, was sedimented. During the Last Glacial Maximum two humid phases took place: the most recent around 20,000-22,000 radiocarbon yr BP, while the older one around 25,000-27,000 radiocarbon yr BP. Finally, the humid phase that occurred during the Holocene can be dated between 7200 and 5500 radiocarbon yr BP. In the Jebel Gharbi the Aterian occupation, which appears to be associated with the most likely African candidates for the dispersal of anatomically modern humans in Eurasia has a great relevance. Research in this region has suggested a revision of the chronological, environmental and functional interpretation of the Aterian complex.Between 18,000 and 6000 BP the Jebel Gharbi region experimented a rather colder and arid climate and, therefore, the presence of water locally available became the main factor which determined the settlement pattern and occupation continuity. The majority of the investigated sites are located near water sources and were visited by hunter-gatherers LSA groups belonging to the Iberomaurusian and, later, Capsian spheres. In the most advanced occupational phases the microlithic technology gave way to macrolithic implements, mainly designed for cutting and processing plant resources, anticipating the Neolithic food-procurement patterns. In the Jebel Gharbi the earliest Holocene sites are dated to around 7500 bp, and at that time the Jefara plain was selected as the principal area of occupation. One of the most relevant sites of this phase, site SJ-03-83 near El Batn, shows a very long occupational sequence and, presumably, an agro-pastoral exploitation of the Libyan plain which at that time was frequently crossed by herders in their pathways to the coast.

The latest research in the Jebel Gharbi (Northern Libya): environment and cultures from MSA to LSA and the first Neolithic findings.

GARCEA, Elena Antonella Alda;
2010

Abstract

In north-western Libya the Jebel Gharbi, concession area for the Italian-Libyan Archaeological Mission organized by the Universities of Rome Sapienza and Cassino, thanks to the notable continuity in its archaeological record, has offered plentiful data even for the most difficult environmental phases in the Last Glacial Maximum, when the largest part of northern Africa was abandoned. Geological studies carried out in the frame of the Joint Mission allowed for some Late Pleistocene and Holocene humid (or not so arid) phases could be identified. The oldest humid phase was dated around 42,000-48,000 radiocarbon years BP, and it follows a dry period during which aeolian sand, dated 49,200 ± 3500 with OSL method, was sedimented. During the Last Glacial Maximum two humid phases took place: the most recent around 20,000-22,000 radiocarbon yr BP, while the older one around 25,000-27,000 radiocarbon yr BP. Finally, the humid phase that occurred during the Holocene can be dated between 7200 and 5500 radiocarbon yr BP. In the Jebel Gharbi the Aterian occupation, which appears to be associated with the most likely African candidates for the dispersal of anatomically modern humans in Eurasia has a great relevance. Research in this region has suggested a revision of the chronological, environmental and functional interpretation of the Aterian complex.Between 18,000 and 6000 BP the Jebel Gharbi region experimented a rather colder and arid climate and, therefore, the presence of water locally available became the main factor which determined the settlement pattern and occupation continuity. The majority of the investigated sites are located near water sources and were visited by hunter-gatherers LSA groups belonging to the Iberomaurusian and, later, Capsian spheres. In the most advanced occupational phases the microlithic technology gave way to macrolithic implements, mainly designed for cutting and processing plant resources, anticipating the Neolithic food-procurement patterns. In the Jebel Gharbi the earliest Holocene sites are dated to around 7500 bp, and at that time the Jefara plain was selected as the principal area of occupation. One of the most relevant sites of this phase, site SJ-03-83 near El Batn, shows a very long occupational sequence and, presumably, an agro-pastoral exploitation of the Libyan plain which at that time was frequently crossed by herders in their pathways to the coast.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/14704
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