Social isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically affected lifestyles, from sedentary behaviours to reduced physical activity, disrupted sleep patterns, and altered dietary habits. As a consequence, severe mental and emotional responses have been registered. There was a significant decline in physical and other meaningful activities of daily living, leisure, social activity, and education. In children, collateral effects of the pandemic include inadequate nutrition with a risk of both overweight and underweight, addiction to screens, lack of schooling, and psychosocial difficulties. Older adults are frequently unable to adapt to lockdown measures and suffer from depression and cognitive complaints. Recent studies focusing on changes in lifestyle during the Covid-19 pandemic and consequences on mental health have been identified in PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Embase, and ScienceDirect. All the available literature has been retrospectively reviewed. The results of the present narrative review suggest that mental distress caused by social isolation seems to be linked not only to personality characteristics but also to several lifestyle components (sleep disruption, altered eating habits, reduced physical activity). This review aims to explore significant changes in lifestyle and quality of life and the impact of these changes on mental health. It also aims to inform clinicians and policymakers about elements that may reduce the adverse psychological effects of the quarantine period imposed during this worldwide crisis. There is an urgent need for tailored preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic mental health interventions for the general population and for higher-risk groups.

Will Nothing Be the Same Again?: Changes in Lifestyle during COVID-19 Pandemic and Consequences on Mental Health

Alessandra Sannella
Methodology
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Social isolation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has drastically affected lifestyles, from sedentary behaviours to reduced physical activity, disrupted sleep patterns, and altered dietary habits. As a consequence, severe mental and emotional responses have been registered. There was a significant decline in physical and other meaningful activities of daily living, leisure, social activity, and education. In children, collateral effects of the pandemic include inadequate nutrition with a risk of both overweight and underweight, addiction to screens, lack of schooling, and psychosocial difficulties. Older adults are frequently unable to adapt to lockdown measures and suffer from depression and cognitive complaints. Recent studies focusing on changes in lifestyle during the Covid-19 pandemic and consequences on mental health have been identified in PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Embase, and ScienceDirect. All the available literature has been retrospectively reviewed. The results of the present narrative review suggest that mental distress caused by social isolation seems to be linked not only to personality characteristics but also to several lifestyle components (sleep disruption, altered eating habits, reduced physical activity). This review aims to explore significant changes in lifestyle and quality of life and the impact of these changes on mental health. It also aims to inform clinicians and policymakers about elements that may reduce the adverse psychological effects of the quarantine period imposed during this worldwide crisis. There is an urgent need for tailored preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic mental health interventions for the general population and for higher-risk groups.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11580/107323
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