The study evaluates knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of mothers regarding the immunization of 841 infants who attended public kindergarten in Cassino and Crotone, Italy. Overall, 57.8% of mothers were aware about all four mandatory vaccinations for infants (poliomyelitis, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis B). The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that this knowledgewas significantly greater amongmotherswith a higher education level and among those who were older at the time of the child's birth. Respondents' attitudes towards the utility of vaccinations for preventing infectious diseaseswere very favourable. Almost all children (94.4%) were vaccinatedwith all three doses of diphtheria ± tetanus (DT), oral poliovirus vaccine ( OPV), and hepatitis B. The proportion of children vaccinated who received all three doses of OPV, DT or diphtheria±tetanus±pertussis (DTP), and hepatitis B vaccines within 1 month of becoming age-eligible ranged from 56.6% for the third dose of hepatitis B to 95.7% for the first dose of OPV. Results of the regression analysis performed on the responses of mothers who had adhered to the schedule for all mandatory vaccinations indicated that birth order significantly predicted vaccination nonadherence, since children who had at least one older sibling in the household were significantly less likely to be age-appropriately vaccinated.. The coverage for the optional vaccines was only 22.5%and 31% for measles±mumps±rubella and for all three doses against pertussis, respectively. Education programmes promoting paediatric immunization, accessibility, and follow-up should be targeted to the entire population.

Mothers and vaccination: knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour in Italy

LANGIANO, Elisa;
1999

Abstract

The study evaluates knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour of mothers regarding the immunization of 841 infants who attended public kindergarten in Cassino and Crotone, Italy. Overall, 57.8% of mothers were aware about all four mandatory vaccinations for infants (poliomyelitis, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis B). The results of a multiple logistic regression analysis showed that this knowledgewas significantly greater amongmotherswith a higher education level and among those who were older at the time of the child's birth. Respondents' attitudes towards the utility of vaccinations for preventing infectious diseaseswere very favourable. Almost all children (94.4%) were vaccinatedwith all three doses of diphtheria ± tetanus (DT), oral poliovirus vaccine ( OPV), and hepatitis B. The proportion of children vaccinated who received all three doses of OPV, DT or diphtheria±tetanus±pertussis (DTP), and hepatitis B vaccines within 1 month of becoming age-eligible ranged from 56.6% for the third dose of hepatitis B to 95.7% for the first dose of OPV. Results of the regression analysis performed on the responses of mothers who had adhered to the schedule for all mandatory vaccinations indicated that birth order significantly predicted vaccination nonadherence, since children who had at least one older sibling in the household were significantly less likely to be age-appropriately vaccinated.. The coverage for the optional vaccines was only 22.5%and 31% for measles±mumps±rubella and for all three doses against pertussis, respectively. Education programmes promoting paediatric immunization, accessibility, and follow-up should be targeted to the entire population.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11580/10248
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